Crab Linguine

IMG_1599Summer, and in England at least crab comes into its own. I have used it elsewhere on this blog but sometimes with the heat of some chili and silky smooth pasta it can make a lovely, but light dish. If you want to serve it as a starter then add some cream, which makes the whole thing very rich – I think too rich for a main course. Victoria Moore in her terrific book on wine suggests a Burgundian chardonnay or Chablis goes well with this – as ever she is spot on.

Serves 4

Ingredients

400g linguine
1tbsp olive oil
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
1tsp fennel seeds, crushed
1 lemon
200g brown crabmeat
200g white crabmeat
Small bunch of flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
Extra virgin olive oil, to finish

IMG_1595

Method

  1. Cook the pasta in a large pan of salted boiling water until al dente.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a frying pan over a medium-low heat and fry the garlic, chilli and fennel seeds for a couple of minutes until soft by not coloured.
  3. Add the zest of half a lemon and the juice of all of it, and then stir in the brown crabmeat.
  4. Drain the pasta, reserving a few spoonfuls of the cooking water, and toss with the sauce, along with the white crabmeat and parsley.
  5. Add the extra water if the dish seems a little dry. Season to taste, and divide between bowls. Drizzle each bowl with a little extra virgin olive oil, and serve immediately.
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About Cooking At Zero Degrees

This is a blog (it also works on an ipad and now has a Facebook page) about what we eat at home. Starters, mains, sauces, side dishes, cocktails and links to local shops. It’s all here. Food is fun, it should be fun to make and fun to eat. For some people making a meal is a chore. If it is then don’t do it; but please, it’s better to eat something, anything, that you make at home from scratch, because prepared, packaged supermarket dinners and food have about as much flavour as the plastic or cardboard package they come in. Food cultivation and husbandry is not just a moral argument. Eggs that don’t come from battery hens do taste better, cattle properly reared have more flavour - and just think about it: at its most simple, if they’re not being pumped full of chemicals then you’re not being pumped full of chemicals. How good is that? If you can buy local, use your neighbourhood shops, you will miss them when they are gone. Most of all, have fun making a meal of it! Oh, and why at zero degrees? Because that’s where we live – in Greenwich, London.
This entry was posted in FIRST COURSE, Fish, Pasta, Quick Suppers, SECOND COURSE, Starter, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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